Helping Those Who Help Others
/ Author: Heidi Martens
/ Categories: Locals, Local 306, Policy Briefs /
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Helping Those Who Help Others

Vulnerable adults can have up to 800 different care providers in their lifetime due to high staff turnover. CLAC members urge the Manitoba government to provide adequate wages and training for support workers helping those with developmental disabilities

Winnipeg—A group of approximately 50 Local 306 members employed by Kindale Industries and Eastman Recycling Services are urging the Manitoba government to address the drastic underfunding of support workers during the current provincial budget consultations.

At a recent membership meeting, members signed letters for the Hon. Heather Stefanson, Minister of Families, outlining the urgent need for increased funding and training for support workers helping those with development disabilities. “Increasing funding for wage rates for vocational and activity-based daytime support workers (all of which are currently excluded from the wage enhancement fund) and funding for worker training by 10% will ultimately provide greater stability and sustainability to a vulnerable population,” says the letter.

The letter outlines the consequences of inadequate funding. “Non-standardized training and inadequate wages in a high responsibility position results in high turnover. . . . Vulnerable adults can have up to 800 different care providers in their lifetime. Turnover means inconsistent care and very high administrative costs for human resources and training.”

Read the complete letter below, as well as CLAC’s resolution in 2017 calling on the the Manitoba government to increase wage rates for vocational and activity-based daytime support workers, and to increase the level funding dedicated to worker training.

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